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New Mills Band

appearing at

Crich Tramway Village

Matlock, Derbyshire

Monday 7th of May 2018

12:00 - 14:00

This Gig is in the past, if you were there leave a review below

New Mills Band Profile Pic

New Mills Band

Genre

Live Performance
Brass Band

Description

New Mills Brass Band (1812) is the oldest brass band in the country & still thriving today. Ages 8-80+, new members of all ages are always welcome to play.

New Mills Old Prize Band is the inheritor of a proud tradition going back 200 years. Its origin lies in a brass and reed band formed in 1811 or 1812 by Timothy Beard and can lay claim to being one of the oldest, if not the oldest, brass band in continuous existence in the country. Beginning as a brass and reed band, it was also at times both an entirely brass then a reed band (in 1869), before finally reverting to a brass band around the turn of the century

The origins of New Mills Old Prize Band are inextricably linked to the Beard family. The Beards of Beard Hall had been resident in the district for 600 years but it was their arrival in New Mills from the Hayfield area in the early 1800s that marks the beginning of the Band. Timothy Beard (1780-1864), the founder of the Band, was one of five children and two of his brothers, John (1781-1872) and Stephen (1787-1831), were to join him in the Band. When Timothy Beard died in 1864, aged 84, he left behind a flourishing and successful band and a family of musicians who were to enrich the community of New Mills and its surrounding villages for many years. For in almost every Methodist Chapel in the area would be found members of the Beard family, both men and women, as conductors, choirmasters, composers, instrumentalists and vocalists. Timothy Beard was also to bequeath the popular tune ‘Ransom’, believed to have been composed in 1838.

Timothy’s son, John Beard (1805-1876) had joined his father’s band in 1819. When he died in 1876 his son Stephen (1844-1911), a stonemason’s labourer, had already succeeded as conductor and was to continue in this role for a quarter of a century.John (1893-1937), Timothy’s great-grandson, was to lead the band during its most successful competitive era before the First World War. Four of his brothers were also in the band at this time – Alfred, Stephen, Walter and Thomas. Between 1895 and 1914 New Mills Old Prize Band was to accumulate more than 130 prizes, besides trophies and individual medals, with ‘Johnnie’ Beard as either conductor or Bandmaster. He was to serve the Band for more than 60 years and was the conductor at the Band’s centenary in 1912.

The Beards long association with the band was to continue into the next generation. John’s sons, John and Arnold and their cousins Tom (euphonium), Herbert (trombone) and John and Samuel Marsland continued to play in the Band. This tradition was only to come to an end with another Timothy (1879-1949), great-great-grandson of Timothy Beard, who was the Band’s deputy conductor.

As with so many other brass bands New Mills was caught up in the patriotic fervour that greeted the declaration of war against Germany in 1914. By November of that year those members of the band who had not already been called up as Territorial or enlisted had decided to volunteer en masse in a reserve Territorial Battalion in the hope that they might become the battalion band. Reinforced by half a dozen players from Thornsett Band they became the 2nd/6th Battalion band of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). They continued to play under the direction of their own conductor Johnnie Beard. The Band was not to escape the tragic losses that were to afflict all of British society. Seven New Mills and two Thornsett band players were to be victims of the war.

Rebuilding the band after the war was not to prove easy, but it was achieved, initially as a brass and woodwind military band. By 1934 it had reverted to a brass band and within a year it was winning prizes at the Bellevue contests. But progress was interrupted by the advent of the Second World War and again the Band was to serve the Sherwood Foresters, but this time as a Home Guard band.

Throughout the post-war period the Band struggled for survival in the face of financial difficulties and the general decline in interest brass band music. But with the recruitment of younger players, the involvement of particular families and, from 1974 until 2012, the financial support of the United Norwest Co-op, the Band has successfully continued in its role as the town’s community band.

At the centenary celebrations in 1912 the Chairman had commented that “there could be but few Bands in the country which had weathered all the adversities of 100 years”, that will be even more true as it celebrates its 200th birthday.

Crich Tramway Village

Venue Type

Museum

Crich Tramway Village Profile Pic

Description

On arrival collect your old penny to pay the conductor your tram fare, and receive a ticket you can use all day. Trams depart regularly from town end, calling at various stops along the mile long track.

In 2010 the Great Exhibition Hall was redisplayed with the ‘Century of Trams’ exhibition. The exhibition takes you on a fascinating journey through a hundred years of tramway development, from 1860 – 1960, taking in horse trams, steam trams and electric trams.

Step back in time along our recreated period street where you won’t have to wait long for the rumble of a vintage tram. Many of the buildings along the street have been rescued from towns and cities across the UK, such as the Derby Assembly Rooms façade which came to Crich after a tragic fire. The Red Lion Pub and Restaurant came all the way from Stoke and was re-built brick by brick. Also look out for the street furniture which is dotted along the street, including the Bundy Clock at Town End Terminus and The Exhibition Hall windows which were rescued from the Doncaster tram depot.

Located in the heart of the period street, Rita’s Tea Rooms are the perfect place to take a breather and relax. Serving hot meals from 12pm – 3.00pm, sandwiches, a range of pies and mouth-watering cakes everyday. Vegetarian and gluten free options are available.

Welcoming families and even dogs, the Red Lion pub opens daily serving a selection of cask ales, local bottled beer, cider and wine and soft drinks, plus hot drinks, panninis and cake. With plentiful outdoor seating, it is the perfect venue to enjoy the period street and do a touch of tram spotting.

Funded by the Countryside Agency, the Woodland Walk & Sculpture Trail allows visitors to stretch their legs on a trail that winds its way through native woodland now dotted with sculptures by our resident sculptor. You may see him at work in his outdoor studio.

With breathtaking views across the Derwent Valley and Derbyshire Countryside the Woodland Walk is the perfect place to escape for a picnic or to while away the hours surrounded by nature. Look out for the sculptures which lurk around every corner such as the Giant Wood Ant and the Green Man.

Children can let off steam in the Discovery Depot – a huge indoor play area with a soft ‘tram’ climbing frame and ball pit and separate soft play area suitable for toddlers. Plenty of chairs are available for parents to have a break and lots of room for pushchairs.

There is a children’s outdoor play area near to the Woodland Walk and Sculpture Trail. It includes a Mordred castle, swings, see-saw, twister, zip wire and pick- up sticks.

ADMISSION PRICES 2018
What’s Included?
Free return admission for 12 months*
Car and Coach Parking
Exhibition Hall
George Stephenson Discovery Centre
Tram Depots
Indoor and Outdoor Play areas
Unlimited Vintage Electric Tram Rides (additional charge for the Horse Tram applies)
Use of Picnic Areas
Woodland Walk

Adult: £17.00
Senior(60+): £13.00
Child (4-15 yrs): £10.00
Family (2 adults / 3 children or 1 adult /4 children): £40.00

Less Able Visitors
Adult: £10.50
Senior(60+): £10.50
Child (4-15 yrs): £7.00
Please note: You can save 50p per ticket on full priced tickets by booking online and these still qualify for free return within 12 months*.

OPENING TIMES
Main Season
1st April - 2nd September: 10am - 5.30pm (last admissions 4pm)

Winter Season
3rd September - 28th October and 4th November: 10am - 4.30pm (last admissions 3pm)

Starlight Spectacular
29th October - 2nd November: 10am - 7.30pm (last admissions 6pm).
Saturday 3rd November 10am - 8.30pm (last admissions 7pm)

Dogs on a lead are accepted, provided that owners clean up after them. They are not permitted in Rita’s Tearooms or the indoor children’s play area, but can go everywhere else, including on the floor of the lower decks of trams if well behaved.

We provide a shelter at Town End for buggies and pushchairs to be left, while you ride the trams.

*Free return admission on full price tickets only (including Adult, Senior, Child and Family tickets). Does not apply on re-entry to 1940’s / World War II events and refers to the 12 month period from when you purchase your full priced ticket and available during our opening dates only.

This performance will be on the Bandstand.

The National Tramway Museum,

Matlock,

Derbyshire,

England,

DE4 5DP.


01773 854 321

Parking AvailableDisabled AccessFamily FriendlyDog FriendlyAlcohol ServedReal Ale ServedCoffee ServedTea Served

Admission Fee: Normal Museum Admission Prices Apply
Click here to book tickets for New Mills Band at Crich Tramway Village

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